In Part 18, I introduced the idea that our states of mind come and go in “motivational waves,” and that we should try to surf them instead of forcing them to conform to our will.

Now let’s go deeper into what these motivational states entail, and how we can use them to our advantage.

A “motivational state” is more colloquially known as a “mood.” Moods usually have a negative connotation when it comes to productivity. Feeling “moody” is generally not considered a desirable thing while working. Often we don’t feel “in the mood” to do something we know we have to do.

But what is the function of moods in humans? What role do they play in helping us adapt and survive?

An intriguing answer is suggested by this paper: that the function of moods is to create momentum in the mind.


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